Military dogs once left behind to die-are now honored and retired

Once upon a time military dogs fought valiantly side by side with their fellow soldiers…often putting their own life at risk…it was what they did loyally and faithfully.  And how were they repaid? During the Vietnam War, over 4,000 military dogs were used and said to have saved over 10,000 servicemen.  In one particular case a military dog by the name of Nemo was procured by the Air Force for sentry dog training. While under attack Nemo alerted his handler of enemy forces and charged into the jungle. Nemo was shot in his right eye, his handler was also shot in the shoulder and fell to the ground. Nemo refused to give up and crawled to his fallen comrade and proceeded to cover his handler’s body with his own.  Both were finally rescued and Nemo was fortunate enough to have been brought back to the states.  In 1973 after the fall of Saigon, the remaining dogs were crated and left on the tarmac along with other “military equipment.”  It’s a safe assumption to think these dogs were probably cruelly tortured and killed either for their meat, or just because they were left behind POWs.

Fortunately, military dogs are now looked upon as fellow comrades and not military equipment.  The bond between the dogs and their handlers cannot be broken.  Time after time we hear stories about how these valiant warriors protect their handlers until the very end….refusing to leave even after their handlers are removed from the battleground.  The dogs often provide comfort to the grieving families of the fallen comrades…knowing that they didn’t die alone…that they were comforted by their devoted companion.

 

Brady Rusk, 12, hugs Eli, the bomb-sniffing military working dog his older brother Marine Pfc. Colton Rusk, worked with before being killed in action in Afghanistan. Photo courtesy U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Bennie J. Davis III

Brady Rusk, 12, hugs Eli, the bomb-sniffing military working dog his older brother Marine Pfc. Colton Rusk, worked with before being killed in action in Afghanistan.
Photo courtesy U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Bennie J. Davis III

 

MINOT AIR FORCE BASE, N.D.-- The 5th Security Forces Squadron held a memorial service in honor of Military Working Dog Jessey/L063. MWD Jessey was first assigned to Minot Air Force Base in June 2007. During her six years of honorable military service, MWD Jessey conducted numerous explosive sweeps for missions within the continental U.S. and other foreign countries. MWD Jessey was officially retired from duty on Nov. 20. Jessey was euthanized due to bone marrow cancer. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Aaron Allmon)  Read the emotional story of Jessey's final days here: http://1.usa.gov/SVRT4R — with Nadia Bek, Gustavo Mario Bergara, Sylvia Ocampos Marques and Neide Ocampos.

MINOT AIR FORCE BASE, N.D.– The 5th Security Forces Squadron held a memorial service in honor of Military Working Dog Jessey/L063. MWD Jessey was first assigned to Minot Air Force Base in June 2007. During her six years of honorable military service, MWD Jessey conducted numerous explosive sweeps for missions within the continental U.S. and other foreign countries. MWD Jessey was officially retired from duty on Nov. 20. Jessey was euthanized due to bone marrow cancer. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Aaron Allmon)
Read the emotional story of Jessey’s final days here: http://1.usa.gov/SVRT4R — with Nadia Bek, Gustavo Mario Bergara, Sylvia Ocampos Marques and Neide Ocampos.

 

Ryan Anderson spent 365 days in Afghanistan with a Golden Retriever named Freddie by his side. The two shared a tight bond that continued for years after when Anderson adopted Freddie. At almost 14 years old it was finally time for Anderson to say goodbye to his friend on Wednesday afternoon.  Freddie served three tours of duty under the British army before serving his fourth tour with Anderson and the United States in Afghanistan in 2009.  Thank you for your service, Freddie, and rest in peace.   Read more here: http://bit.ly/10Ccqj0

Ryan Anderson spent 365 days in Afghanistan with a Golden Retriever named Freddie by his side. The two shared a tight bond that continued for years after when Anderson adopted Freddie. At almost 14 years old it was finally time for Anderson to say goodbye to his friend on Wednesday afternoon.
Freddie served three tours of duty under the British army before serving his fourth tour with Anderson and the United States in Afghanistan in 2009.
Thank you for your service, Freddie, and rest in peace.
Read more here: http://bit.ly/10Ccqj0

 

ARLINGTON, VA - JUNE 19: U.S. Navy military working dog handlers attend the burial of Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Sean E. Brazas June 19, 2012 at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia. Petty Officer Brazas, a K-9 handler, was killed while being ambushed as he was helping a fellow officer into a helicopter in Panjaw’l, Afghanistan on May 30, 2012. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images) 2012 Getty Images

ARLINGTON, VA – JUNE 19: U.S. Navy military working dog handlers attend the burial of Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Sean E. Brazas June 19, 2012 at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia. Petty Officer Brazas, a K-9 handler, was killed while being ambushed as he was helping a fellow officer into a helicopter in Panjaw’l, Afghanistan on May 30, 2012. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images) 2012 Getty Images

 

 

Pfc. Colton Rusk of Orange Grove, Texas, died at age 20 while conducting combat operations in Helmand Province, Afghanistan.

Pfc. Colton Rusk of Orange Grove, Texas, died at age 20 while conducting combat operations in Helmand Province, Afghanistan.

 

Advertisements

7 Responses

  1. Reblogged this on The Way Eye See The World and commented:
    Wonderful post by another blogger.

  2. Thank you for this. Teary eyed. ❤

  3. Reblogged this on The Lessons of Chi and commented:
    A wonderful piece on honoring military dogs.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: